*What is the difference between a Greek Orthodox baptism and a Roman Catholic baptism?

All About Orthodox Baptisms



What is the difference between a Greek Orthodox and a Roman Catholic baptism?



The nature of the baptism is the same for both the Roman Catholics as the Greek Orthodox baptism: It is the cleansing of sin from the baptized individual and the beginning of membership into the Church. Both religions recognize baptism as a Sacrament. Both churches conduct a Trinitarian baptism – or acknowledge the Trinity of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Both churches pledge the baptized individual to the Service of God forever.


Some of the differences between a Greek Orthodox and a Roman Catholic baptism include:

  • The Greek Orthodox church conducts deep water baptism. The Roman Catholic church does not have deep water baptism.
  • In the Greek Orthodox baptism, the individual is tonsured (the cutting of the hair) but is not in the Roman Catholic service.
  • The baptized individual in the Greek Orthodox church must receive a cross to wear.
  • The Godparents are obligated by the church to care for the raising of the child should the parents perish, at least with regard to his or her religious education. Godparents are considered to be second parents to the baptized individual in the Greek Orthodox church.
  • The Sacrament of Chrismation is the equivalent of the Sacrament of Confirmation in the Roman Catholic church – the giving of the Holy Spirit (Communion). In the Roman Catholic Church, Confirmation is separate from the Baptism – given to those 7 or older - and is performed by a Bishop. In the Orthodox Church a priest performs the Sacrament of Baptism followed by the Sacrament of Confirmation—the first Communion, in the same service.
  • The Godparents in the Orthodox baptism are asked to “spit on the devil” during the service.


<< RETURN TO ORTHODOX BAPTISM FAQ >>

Have a question you don’t see answered? Email us at info@blessedcelebration.com